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Another

by Christian Robinson

Summary

Another by Christian Robinson is a story that raises questions about reality, other’s perspectives, and identity.

Another follows the adventure of a young girl and her cat through a journey in which they encounter new perspectives, discover new worlds, and meet another version of themselves. The story leaves the audience wondering, what might you do?

Read aloud video by Mr. Manny

Guidelines for Philosophical Discussion

Another by Christian Robinson is a story that raises questions about reality, other’s perspectives, and identity. A girl and her cat wake up one night and follow another cat into a hole where they go on an adventure. During their adventure, they encounter new worlds, other kids, and even another version of themselves.

The girl and the cat go into a hole which transports them to a new world. This offers a chance for students to talk about worldly realities. Students can consider where the girl and the cat went. Was this new world real? What makes something real and how do we know? Students can discuss the possibility of if it was a dream and if dreams are real.

Along the way, the girl and the cat pass by other children. Students can consider similarities and differences between the characters. How much can you tell about someone just by looking at them? Students can discuss if they can make assumptions about other people and the validity of truth of these assumptions.

The girl and the cat encounter characters who look very similar to themselves. Here, students can reflect on what it is that really makes them, them. If they met another version of themselves, what would they say or do?

Questions for Philosophical Discussion

Reality

  1. Where do the girl and the cat go?
  2. Are the girl and the cat imagining the adventure?
  3. Is there a difference between imagining something and something really happening?
  4. Can you imagine things that you have not done? How do we imagine things that don’t already exist in reality?
  5. How do we use our imagination?
  6. Could everything happening in the story be a dream? Who’s dream is it?
  7. Are dreams real? Why or why not?
  8. Are the other kids in the story dreaming too? Are they real?

Other Perspectives

  1. Who else do the girl and the cat see on their adventure?
  2. What are some similarities between the girl and the cat and the other kids? Some differences?
  3. What do we know about the girl, the cat, and the other kids in the story? What do we not know?
  4. How much can you tell about someone just by looking at them?
  5. Do the girl and the cat know the other kids? How do you know?
  6. Did the girl, the cat, and the other kids seem happy? Did they seem sad? How would you know?
  7. What makes you happy? How do you know?

Identity

  1. At the end of the story, the girl and cat meet another girl and cat. Who are they?
  2. What are some similarities and differences between the two pairs?
  3. Did they meet another version of themselves? Is there one true version of them?
  4. Is how you see yourself the same or different from how others see you?
  5. If you met another version of yourself, what would you say?
  6. What really makes you, you? Is it what you think about yourself? Is it what other people think about you?

Find tips for leading a philosophical discussion on our Resources page.

Download & Print Email Book Module Back to All Books
Back to All Books Cover illustration for Another by Christian Robinson featuring a small black girl with colorful barrettes walking in front of her little black cat. Download & Print Email Book Module

About the Prindle Institute

As one of the largest collegiate ethics institutes in the country, the Prindle Institute for Ethics’ uniquely robust national outreach mission serves DePauw students, faculty and staff; academics and scholars throughout the United States and in the international community; life-long learners; and the Greencastle community in a variety of ways. In 2019, the Prindle Institute partrnered with Thomas Wartenberg and became the digital home of his Teaching Children Philosophy discussion guides.

Further Resources

Some of the books on this site may contain characterizations or illustrations that are culturally insensitive or inaccurate. We encourage educators to visit the Association for Library Service to Children’s resource guide for talking to children about issues of race and culture in literature. They also have a guide for navigating tough conversations.  PBS Kids’ set of resources for talking to young children about race and racism might also be useful for educators.

Philosophy often deals with big questions like the existence of a higher power or death. Find tips for leading a philosophical discussion on our resources page.

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